Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

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Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 00:51

Wotcha folks,

When I first started this topic/article I didn't realize just how big a task it would be to make this a presentation rather than just another post :o Sourcing the photos and making sure that they are the best quality took up a great deal of time, then they all had to be resized and in most cases 'tweaked' for clarity and vibrancy.

The other problem I faced was getting over the 'character' limit on the post, after about 15 seconds of deliberation I decided to use consecutive posts each containing an individual subject within the article ....

However, now that I've finished the first part, I'm pleased I persevered with it and didn't throw the towel in. I certainly came close to it on numerous occasions.

I hope that you will enjoy reading this, as much as I have compiling it; some of Yamaha's greatest design moments are featured in this topic, I have just taken random examples from the 1960's onwards so it's not in chronological order :wink:

All photos are the property of the Yamaha Corporation and accompanying narratives are the written words of the designers themselves 8)

Please feel free to leave any comments ..... :wink:

Mike :D



2000-2010
The symbol of the new Yamaha Ginza building, created with technology and craftsmanship. Design: Yukinori Mikage

In the designer's own words .... The new Yamaha Ginza building opened in February 2010, presenting Yamaha's new face to the world.

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Yamaha C6XA Ginza

The only piano of its kind anywhere in the world, the C6XA Ginza* model was specially crafted to commemorate this occasion. Inspired by traditional lacquering techniques, the design features a clematis vine, sometimes referred to as “iron wire” in Japan, and represents our desire to create ties that bond the city, people, and music firmly together.

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Decorated with a Clematis Vine

There is ambitious testing being conducted with the C6XA Ginza model on a technical level. Although wood inlay is typically a combination of wood and wood, or wood and oyster shell, we decided to use this technique for this instrument, marking the first time that it had been used to inlay wood chips in the mirrored black surface of a polished piano.
We used a laser to cut the flower pattern, while technical personnel and the designers themselves laid wood-chips ... some with tips of less than one mm in length ... in the pattern by hand before coating them.

The inlay work is then polished assiduously by skilled craftsmen to bring the delicate patterns to the surface.

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Combining Advanced Technology with Traditional Techniques.

To allow us to join materials with different rates of contraction, we developed a new technique for bonding materials while dry. Three types of wood, including rosewood, as well as oyster shell, lend color to the surface, which is coated with a thin application of oil finish. In addition to the color they provide, these materials offer a delicate contrast of texture and feel. The culmination of these efforts, the C6XA Ginza model is more than just a commemorative model; combining advanced technology with traditional techniques, it is the perfect piano for Yamaha Ginza as it moves forward to face the next half-century.

*The C6XA Ginza Model is a commemorative model created to mark the completion of the new Yamaha Ginza building.
It is not for sale.





Just in case you are all itching to get hold of one ... The C3XA, an instrument with oyster shell inlays on the music stand and front board similar to those of the C6XA, is available for purchase. :D :D

Okay, moving on to 'The Million Dollar Piano' ...........
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'The Million Dollar Piano' ........... 2000-2010

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 00:52

The Million Dollar Piano for Elton John. Design: Akie Hinokio & Yukinori Mikage.

In the designer's own words .... We received a video letter from Elton John with an idea for a piano that could materialize out of nowhere on stage during his performances.

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One Of A Kind ... The Million Dollar Piano.

Beginning in September 2011 in Las Vegas, Elton John was to appear in a three-month show called "The Million Dollar Piano."

The design that we created in answer to his request features images lining the exterior of the piano that synchronize with the imagery on stage, allowing the piano to blend chameleon-like into its surroundings before transforming its appearance to match the progress of the song being performed.

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Designed With Bare Minimum of Expressive Elements.

Seeking to use the bare minimum of expressive elements to represent its identity as an acoustic piano with only the bare minimum of elements, we built a full-size mock-up of the instrument and then used computer graphics to assess the effect that lights would have on its appearance, which led us to the polygonal shape of the finished product.

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Polygonal Shaped.

Finally we left for Las Vegas with the completed piano. The instrument that had seemed so huge in the piano workshop appeared tiny when seen on the giant stage from the audience seats in the show.
But the second that the show started and Elton began to play, our creation was transformed instantaneously into a dynamic grand piano.

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Elton John and The Million Dollar Piano.

For me, in that moment, at that very instant, the piano itself was finally complete.




What have we got next .... oh yes, lets move to something that use 'trickery' :lol:

The MOX is a lightweight workstation synthesizer ...........
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The MOX is a Lightweight Workstation Synthesizer ...........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 00:53

Still in the 2000-2010 decade lets look at 'Smoothness' that gives form to aesthetic design.
Designer of the moX6/moX8: Atsushi Kitazawa. Designer of the moXF6/moXF8: Risa Komuro.

In the designer's own words .... The MOX is a lightweight workstation synthesizer that offers excellent cost-performance, while inheriting the superb sounds and functionality of Yamaha’s flagship "MOTIF" workstations, instruments that have won the acclaim of professional musicians.

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Yamaha moX6/moX8 Workstation Synths.

The design maintains the functional interface of MOTIF-series keyboards, and is intended to provide a lively feel that inspires people to touch and play it.

In designing the MOX, I explored the motivations behind the preferences for various synthesizers and the music for which these instruments are used before arriving at a keyword for the design; "smoothness."

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Smoothness of The Yamaha moXF6

Encompassed within this keyword are four concepts:

    1. "Motivational Smoothness" which inspires musicians to play.
    2. "Easy & Speedy Smoothness" which allows the performer to use the instrument quickly and easily.
    3. "Sync Smoothness" which encourages players to bond with their instrument.
    4. "Quality Smoothness" which is an expression of the quality felt with the MOX synthesizer.

To achieve all of this, a great deal of expression was put into shaping the silhouette and cross-section, and into the grooved panel surfaces which divide up the various areas.

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Images provided may be of development models and differ from actual products.

In contrast to the radical appearance of top-end models, I believe that we have offered a concept for a new kind of full-size synthesizer that musicians are able to relate to on equal terms.




Full details and specifications of the Yamaha moX6 & moX8 can be found here: http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical- ... ries/mox6/

Yamaha moXF6 & moXF8 can be found here: http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical- ... ab=feature

Okay, where do we go from here :)
Lets take a look at the Yamaha PSR-E323/E223 Digital Keyboards ...........
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Yamaha PSR-E323/E223 Digital Keyboards ...........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 00:59

Designing for 'Ease of Use'. Designer: Toshihide Suzuki.

In the designer's own words .... The PSR-E323/E223 digital keyboards let even beginning plays taste the joy of playing music.

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Yamaha PSR-E323 & E223 Keyboards.

Since the instruments come with a range of tones and accompaniments as well as a lesson function, we devoted ourselves to creating an interface that lets the player enjoy performing without any effort.

To that end, we first put ourselves in the player's position, test-playing existing keyboards exhaustively. This brought us to the realization that aspects such as switch positioning almost never lent themselves to intuitive use when seen through the eyes of a novice. Functional though these instruments were, they lacked the appeal needed to charm the player.

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We threw ourselves into the search for an interface that would look good and be easy to use. One of the solutions that emerged was to establish cross zones on the panel, in addition to the horizontal colour divisions and partitioning characteristic to Yamaha keyboards. We then arrayed the elements of the interface according to purpose, into areas for sound and song selection, accompaniment playback, and lesson functions.

For example, we placed the play/stop button for the auto-accompaniment in from of the player’s left hand, for easy operation while the right hand plays the melody. Conversely, the right side of the instrument is reserved for sound and song selection, and features lists of sounds and songs displayed where the player can see them with minimal eye movement.

We also looked at the design of each and every button. Take, for example, the simple shape, reminiscent of a child’s building blocks. Adding these elements to the design gave it an endearing quality that makes you want to reach out and touch it.

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Reach Out And Touch It.

We also put a great deal of effort into details such as how the buttons feel to push, and curved all the surfaces that the player's fingers are likely to touch. Our goal for this design was to go beyond the exterior of the instrument, achieve an ease of use that allows anyone to enjoy playing it.

I believe that is a vital aspect of product design.




Back to me again :wink:

Now lets move on to something completely different, The Yamaha AvantGrand ...........
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The Yamaha AvantGrande N2 & N3 ...........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:02

Heritage and the Future. Designer: Masaharu Ono and Kao Nimura

AvantGrand. Hybrid pianos that combines a grand piano action with advanced digital technology.
The designers take up the story from here .... Known as the "king of pianos" the grand piano we see today has undergone several changes since its birth in the 1700s: The number of keys in its keyboard, the keyboard action, and even the use of a metal frame.

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AvantGrande N2 & N3 Hybrid Pianos.

The AvantGrand is a hybrid instrument that combines advanced digital technology with techniques honed by craftsmen over countless years of piano-making.
This fusion has produced a new grand piano that takes innovation to a higher level - a grand piano for the 21st century. With this new design, the critical factor lay in which parts of the instrument's grand piano heritage to retain, and which parts to change.

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A Grand Piano For the 21st Century.

What not to change ... We wanted to retain everything about the instrument that tells you that you are playing a grand piano. Not just the feel of the keyboard, but the textures and visual cues, in fact, everything about the interface that conveys this sensation. Vibration travelling to a pianist through the keyboard action, the keys, and the instrument body... the reflections of the keys and the player's fingers, mirrored in the keyboard lid... we kept the large piano top too, wanting the pianist to retain that unique "ceremony" of opening the top of a grand piano before performing.

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Large Open Lid of The AvantGrande N3

The things we changed ... We modified the S-shape of the grand piano body, retaining the elegance of its form while aiming for a compactness only possible with an electronic sound source.
With the N2 in particular, we were able to offer the playability and refinement of a grand piano in an instrument with an extremely small footprint.

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Meanwhile, the design of the N3 exposes its four speakers, mounted under the piano top in a beautiful wood cabinet. The instrument also has a stunning finish, like the bell of a finely-crafted wind instrument.

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Top Open Showing Four Speakers of The AdvantGrande N3

This seemingly novel approach was actually in line with our more traditional objective - to openly display the mechanisms used for creating sound and continue the tradition of functional beauty inherited from the original grand piano.




:D
Our next stop goes back to the 1980's with a gander at the Yamaha Clavinova CVP models ..........
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Yamaha Clavinova CVP Models ..........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:10

'Subtracting to add value'. Designer: Sunao Okamura and Akie Hinokio

Equipped with a diverse range of voices and advanced functions, the Clavinova CVP models epitomize Yamaha digital pianos.

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Yamaha Clavinova

Since their début in 1983, they have evolved to the point of maturity over a quarter of a century, gaining a larger speaker box and body for high-quality sound and advanced functionality, together with a wealth of curved surfaces and lines to add a “richness” of form, following a philosophy of augmentation to add value.

Lifestyles have also changed however, and many people choose a digital piano over an upright. For these users, the Clavinova is a piano, and it was this perspective that became the starting point for the design of the new CVP. We considered questions such as what creates the beauty of the grand piano, or which elements of the past CVP heritage should be continued in the new CVP, arriving at the conclusion that the new design should feature open horizontal planes based on straight lines and flat surfaces, with a solid-feeling body supported by stylish legs, offering a feeling of comfortable tension.

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Clavinova CVP 509 with Stylish Legs.

We removed as many curves as possible on the new CVP, and re-evaluated the structure and size of the body, speaker box, and pedal box, to give the instrument a new silhouette.

The new form features legs that have been moved from the center of the instrument to its extreme front, and have been redesigned with a completely new shape, offering a precise, elegant form when standing.

Undoubtedly, the CVP-503 takes a different path from the larger, more multifunctional, and more complicated evolution of CVP models thus far.

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It represents a complete turnaround from these models, following a 'subtract to add value' approach that conveys the designer's intents with purity, and offers a clear path for future Clavinovas to follow.

Full Clavinova Range: http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical- ... ode=series




Now back to Mr Suzuki with the Yamaha CFX Concert Grand Piano - Capturing 'Beauty and Power' in a Design ...........
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Capturing 'Beauty and Power' in a Design ...........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:11

Capturing “Beauty and Power” in a Design. Designer: Toshihide Suzuki.

To a pianist, a full concert grand piano is the ultimate tool for expressing oneself through sound. To the audience, it is a unique instrument, stately and dignified;

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Yamaha CFX Concert Grand.

The sight of a pianist performing with a full concert grand, or perhaps even commanding an orchestra, offers a visual impression unique to the grand piano, and is an integral part of the musical experience of going to a concert.

When designing Yamaha's new concert grand piano, we aimed to emphasize the essential appeal of this magnificent instrument by honing its essential functions, and showcasing the innovations that it possesses as a modern piano.

We strove to, and succeeded in, creating an identity that achieved both goals.

Until now, we had refrained from making any significant changes to the fundamental construction and shape of the piano, due to the fact that every element in construction of a true concert grand piano has a direct effect on the sound.
However, in designing the CFX, we wanted to break away from the fixed ideas and styles of traditional grand piano design to achieve the ultimate in performance characteristics, while still retaining a respect for the long history of the piano.

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Engineers, artisans, and designers worked together to bring to bear knowledge and techniques accrued over many years to contribute to this innovative design process. One example of this is in our belief that the sound “travel” that takes the beautiful sound of a piano to the furthest corners of a concert hall is unified with the “travel” of a design, which is why we gave a powerful, clear shape to the sides of the CFX. At the same time, we heightened the unity of the shape of the sideboards, key-bed, and legs to create a unique silhouette that steps well beyond the norm for a conventional concert grand piano.

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The pedal box, so essential to a pianist’s musical expression, features a new configuration of a box supported by two legs. This affords it the strength to remain firm even if the pianist presses down with all their strength, while giving it a bold new look that further complements the modern design of the new CFX. Sweeping changes have also been made to the frame at the heart of the instrument’s sound.

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We looked in detail at the shape of the ribs and the tone holes and at the connections between each component element, with an emphasis on tone and the flow of sound and power. The result is a beautiful, powerful frame that gives life to the CFX’s “Beauty and Power” concept.

This is a instrument that affords the pianist the highest level of musical expression. In this design, we offer a new incarnation worthy of Yamaha’s new flagship model concert grand piano, The CFX.




I'd hate to think how much that costs ..... hmmmmm, wanting to know got the better of me :lol: And what a load of hassle it was too, the companies that did stock it here in the UK all showed it as POA, but after a quick call to a friend of mine in the piano business - I got the UK price :wink:

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The Yamaha CFX Concert Grand .... A Mere £105,000

8)

What next, ah yes ... The Piaggero is a new brand of electronic piano ..........
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The Piaggero is a new brand of electronic piano ..........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:15

The essence of a piano in a slim body. Designer: Sunao Okamura.

The Piaggero is a new brand of electronic piano. Sunao Okamura takes up the story ....

Combining 'piano' with the Italian word 'leggero', meaning light, the name 'piaggero' evokes a slim, lightweight piano.

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Piaggero NP-V80

I wanted to craft a piano that could be carried with easy, and played anywhere. The theme behind this design was to create an instrument that combined the essence of the piano with a trustworthy feel in a slim body. To this end, it was vital that we focus on the process of capturing the essential nature of the piano.

How compact could we make the instrument, leaving the image and values of the piano itself intact without sacrificing anything? We gained some hints from high-grade, pocket-sized cameras and audio devices, which we felt had a real sense of compactness and authenticity. At the same time, we discussed the qualities of pianos at great length, arranging our thoughts on what qualities make a piano a piano. It turned out that different people defined these qualities differently. Some people associate pianos with their black, mirror-like exterior surfaces, while others see them in more structural terms, believing that such qualities have more to do with the piano’s elegant horizontal orientation.

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The Piaggero NP-V80, A Slim and Lightweight Piano.

We also debated on whether the essence of a piano lay in its detail, like the unfettered space around the keyboard, or the depiction of the logo. In the course of our discussions we came to realize how we could bring the Piaggero concept to reality.

After numerous detailed mock-ups, this is the Piaggero design that we adopted.

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In creating this design, we experimented with a variety of difficult construction techniques in order to simplify the Piaggero’s appearance. The 'essence' of the piano is an eternal theme for me, involved as I am in the creation of pianos.

I believe that the response to this challenge varies from person to person, and likely continuously over time; a notion I will continue to pursue as I create pianos.

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:D I have listened to one of these at my local Yammie dealer, it's a great sounding instrument and has a real quality finish to it ... here is a quick overview of the features:

    Graded Soft Touch keyboard features graded lightweight keys for a more piano-like response
    Choose from hundreds of instrumental sounds!
    Enjoy playing along with your own personal backing band with 165 styles
    A variety of fun learning technologies including Performance Assistant and lessons
    Arpeggiator function provides intriguing new musical potential!

    Go-anywhere portability, up to the minute style, Yamaha's legendary sound quality and ease of use, together with a 76-note 'box key' Graded Soft Touch keyboard - the perfect Piaggero for new hobby players or experienced musicians.

What next ... The CP1, a new flagship model CP stage piano. Déjà vu … but new ..........
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Déjà vu … but new ..........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:21

CP1, a new flagship model CP stage piano - Déjà vu… but new! Designer: Saizo Sato.

Beginning with the 1976 release of the electric grand CP70/80 series, instruments that still see service today, and are loved by artists the world over, CP-brand instruments have earned themselves an unshakable position in the world of stage pianos.

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Yamaha’s Flagship in This Line, The CP1.

As Yamaha’s flagship in this line, the CP1 features piano voices of astonishing quality, and merits an appearance worthy of what really is the king of stage pianos. That being said, as a professional instrument, the demands on a stage piano are of a very high order.
For example, it needs to be tough and portable enough to stand up to repeated moving while on tour, the layout of keyboard and controls must not intrude on performers’ concentration when performing, and the texture must be of a quality that makes people proud to own it.

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To meet professional requirements such as these, designers aimed for a stage piano form that was recognizably familiar, but also looked like it contained the kind of functionality that an advanced stage instrument would have; two design vectors that appear contradictory at first, yet blended here in harmony.

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The CP1 sound was impressive even in development, with the development team were working with the shared concept that this instrument would be like a Japanese Katana (a Japanese Samurai sword), able to win through on simple functionality alone.
In the end they were able to arrive at a design solution that combined freshness with a traditional form by refining the various elements of the design in that image, and working to obtain perfection in such details as the materials and coatings.

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So onwards we go .... From the man that designed the stunning Yamaha CFX Concert Grand came a compact synthesizer you can carry anywhere ... The MX49/MX61 ...........
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The MX49/MX61 ...........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:24

From the man that designed the stunning Yamaha CFX Concert Grand came a compact synthesizer you can carry anywhere ... The MX49/MX61

More compact and simple. Designer: Toshihide Suzuki.

Toshihide Suzuki explains ....with the MX49 and MX61, we aimed to create synthesizers of suitable compactness and lightweight enough to carry easily to performances in rehearsal studios and live venues.

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Yamaha MX49 and MX61

In order to convey an impression of smallness and of being easy to use, we constructed multiple mock-ups based on the plans received from engineering. I found several of these mock-ups to be an ideal size, and presented them for proposals as examples of the dimensions a synthesizer should possess in order to be termed truly compact.

The compact size of the mock-ups that we presented was more than just an ideal—it was a technically-endorsed possibility. During design, we sent out for many plans and cross-sectional views of other models for reference, and even assessed how realistic our proposals were in terms of their internal structure and the layout of the switches on the panel.

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As a result of these efforts, we were able to use this mock-up in development and engineering staff, which allowed us to achieve our initial concept of a synthesizer more lightweight and compact than ever before.

With regard to usability, we did away with the concept of 'modes' and made bold changes to some of the normal specifications in order to produce an instrument easy enough for anyone to use. The operations panel features four knobs that allow the performer to alter voice parameters in real time to alter the sound, one of the true joys of using a synthesizer.

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These knobs are something that we created specifically for the MX series. We designed the upper surface of the instrument body in a matte finish with deep knurling, from which the index areas emerge with a glossy prominence. The knobs are pleasantly tactile and turn easily, and feature a design that makes the indices readily visible.

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Okay, our next designer needs his bumps felt over this one :lol:

The Yamaha Modus F11/F01 - A digital piano with a new shape ...........
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Accenting space Design ..........

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:35

MODUS F11/F01 A digital piano with a new shape, designed to accent the interior of a contemporary room.
Accenting space Design. Designer: Yoshihiro Katsumata

The Modus F01 project had its beginnings in our quest to create a new electronic piano like nothing that had been seen before.

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Modus F01/F11 Electronic Piano.

We began by looking at what people do with an electronic piano, and what role the pianos take in their owners' lives. In doing so, we found that all that was actually required of an electric piano was a keyboard and speakers for performing, together with a cabinet to bring them together. However, we also observed that the piano held other functions that other instruments didn't. We came to realize that the piano held an 'identity' when in a room.

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The electronic piano is compact, and thus can be placed with more freedom than an acoustic piano. It is also an instrument that offers its designers a freedom in construction that is not present in instruments that rely on physical structure for sound generation. All of this prompted us to begin our design by focusing more and more on the identity that this piano brings to a room.

Previously, our electronic piano designs had been aimed at making the instrument a part of the room, but with the MODUS we wanted to put its identity on display, accenting its presence in the room.

There, between open space and the people around, is an instrument, and acting an interface to that instrument, a wall.

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The colourful board of the MODUS accents its presence in any interior space, fulfilling the role of a barrier between people, space, and music.

(Text: Yamaha Design Laboratory/Ikuo Mine)




Okay, lets go back to the 1980's to what is considered to be the most famous keyboard of all time: The Yamaha DX7 ..........
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The Yamaha DX7 .......... The Most Famous Keyboard Of All Ti

Postby Mike Bracchi » 16 Oct 2013 01:44

DX7 - Released in 1983, this digital synthesizer with its FM sound engine revolutionized the global music scene.

Using design to herald the arrival of the digital age. Designer: Yasuhiro Kira.

In 1983, at the height of the techno-pop movement and the zenith of popularity for analog synthesizers, Yamaha released the innovative DX7 digital synthesizer.

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This called for a design that made it obvious to all that it was the first digital synthesizer around.
The design expressed the newness of this completely different digital dimension and we had to create a design that heralded the arrival of the digital age.

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To do that, we aimed for a simple, square form that would be a vivid contrast to analogue synthesizers and their panels crowded with buttons and knobs. We removed all physical controllers except for the keyboard, using smooth membrane switches, something relatively new for a musical instrument.

In utilizing this switch-based digital control for all aspects of its operation, the DX7 gave a clear message to that player that here was a synthesizer completely different to all those that had gone before.
Adding these membrane switches to the design, it was vital that we make use of a color scheme that maximized their visibility.

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To achieve a clear contrast with the dark brown of the body, we used a vivid green for the panel that we came to refer to as 'DX Green' .... DX Green was eventually used on variety of products, and it came to symbolize digital technology.

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(text: Yamaha Design Laboratory/Ikuo Mine)


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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Mike Bracchi » 17 Oct 2013 15:51

Wotcha folks,

I have finished the first part of Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades ... I hope that you enjoy reading through it at your leisure, I'm looking forward to reading some of your comments :wink:

Mike.

Just in case you want a hard copy or share it with another site I have 'printed' a PDF file of the topic :wink:

Yamaha Design _Synapses_ Through The Decades (Part 1).pdf


Or, you can Start @ The Beginning ..... Here!
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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Westgarth » 17 Oct 2013 22:32

Hi Mike

I could definitely fill a few rooms in the mansion with some of those. Excellent article, I think you've missed your vocation here mate, you should have been a journalist! :o

Thanks for putting in the time to produce this.
Regards

Steve
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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Mike Bracchi » 18 Oct 2013 02:06

Westgarth wrote:Hi Mike

I could definitely fill a few rooms in the mansion with some of those. Excellent article, I think you've missed your vocation here mate, you should have been a journalist! :o

Thanks for putting in the time to produce this.


Ooooh, I don't know about that Steve :D I am pleased that you enjoyed the article though, makes it all worth while 8)

Here is a little taster of what you can expect in part 2 which should be ready towards the end of next month :wink:

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My neighbour was having a coffee with me earlier this week whilst I was working on the Yamaha images, he made a comment about Yamaha making great motor-bikes and motor-boats to which I replied, they also make a host of sports gear from tennis rackets to archery, skiing and golfing equipment ... I went on to say that we haven't even touched on the range of musical instruments and sound equipment that they manufacture as well ... he replied, "seems like they make everything bar the kitchen sink"

'Wronnnnnnggggggg' ..... and showed him this, a genuine 1964 Yamaha N-1 FRP Wash Tub :lol: :lol:

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Mike
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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Wally Gator » 18 Oct 2013 05:33

Thank you so much for your efforts Mike. This is extremely interesting. Looking forward to part two.
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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Rev Tony Newnham » 18 Oct 2013 10:19

Hi

Both articles downloaded to read when I find some spare time (what's that?)

Every Blessing

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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Eddie Smart » 22 Oct 2013 22:55

My goodness mike, what a facinating insight to the thoughts of the yamaha designers, and here i am just thinking the stick some electronics into a plastic box and give it a name ... like Tyros :lol: How wrong am i. :roll:

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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby Mike Bracchi » 10 Oct 2014 21:12

A brief look at the latest sounds of the Electone from Yamaha, Stagea ELS-02.






Eat your heart out Hammond ............

Electone STAGEA ELS-02 Series Performance Video
composed and played by Hiroshi Kubota

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Re: Yamaha Design "Synopses" Through The Decades (Part 1)

Postby LeoP » 16 Oct 2014 20:20

A magnificent organ and and stunning performer, the organ certainly is every bit as good as the Hammond and of course it has so much more to offer than the organs manufactured by suzuki hammond. another great post mike, k eep up the grand work.
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